#36 Jeff Garner on Sustainable Fashion for the Future

#36 Jeff Garner on Sustainable Fashion for the Future

We put them on our bodies every day. We run in them, and we sleep in them. We have our best and worst moments in them. I’m talking about clothes, and they’ve been a part of human history for thousands of years. But what we may not be aware of is what our clothes are made of can impact our health. Sustainable clothing is something we all should be thinking about, for ourselves and for the future. 

WELCOME TO THE DARIN OLIEN SHOW. 

Jeff Garner wants to know what your underwear is made of.

We don’t think much about the clothes we put on in the morning. But for Jeff, it’s all he thinks about. Growing up in a Civil War town on a horse farm in Tennessee, his friends weren’t much into fashion. But didn’t stop him from designing all their clothes. He appreciated the little things about clothes that most of us take for granted. An old cardigan from his grandfather, a lacy scarf from his grandmother – all these things were timeless inspiration pieces for him.

But it wasn’t just about looks for Jeff. As a successful fashion designer, he cares about the fabrics and materials he uses in each design. His childhood was full of organic, natural materials that his family valued. But as he entered California’s fashion world, he realized “natural” wasn’t always what it claimed to be. 

With his couture line Prophetik, Jeff’s mission is to offer beautiful, unique clothing dyed with plants and made with naturally sustainable fiber. Jeff is an artist at heart, and he showcases that in every piece he creates. 

But it’s more than just fashion to Jeff. In this episode, he explains the toxic chemicals present in most store bought garments and the horrible effects they have on our health. He tells me why the fabric we choose for our underwear and sheets is the most important. I’m not a fashion guy, so Jeff really opened my eyes to things I was never aware of. Our addiction to cheap clothes is not only harming our health, but it’s also fueling an industry free from regulation and free from accountability. This trickle-down effect is detrimental not only to us, but to the people around the world forced to work under inhumane conditions, and their surrounding environments. Jeff has renewed my focus for sure, and I hope this conversation will do the same for you.

Other great info in this episode:
  • Jeff’s origin story into the world of fashion
  • How Prophetik came to be
  • Why we should all buy hemp underwear and sheets
  • The lies we’re fed about polyester
  • Why Jeff makes his own silk board shorts
  • Why we all need to shift our thinking on how much we should pay for a piece of clothing
  • Hemp, hemp and more hemp
  • The beauty of plant-based dyes
  • The perils of yoga pants
  • How profit and greed taints the fashion industry
  • The Bra Lick Test
  • Why we should all sleep nude
  • Victoria Secrets’ secrets

The Darin Olien Show is produced by the team at Must Amplify. If you’re looking to give a voice to your brand, and make sure that it’s heard by the right people, head to www.mustamplify.com/darin to see what Amplify can do for you.

Episode Transcript

Darin: You are listening to the Darin Olien Show. I’m Darin. I spent the last 15 years exploring the planet looking for healthy foods, superfoods, environmental solutions, and I’ve had my mind blown along the way by the people, the far off places I have been, and the life-altering events that have changed my life forever. My goal is to help you dive deep into some of the issues of our modern-day life, society’s fatal conveniences. The things that we do that we’re indoctrinated into thinking we have to, even though those things are negatively affecting us, and in some cases, slowly destroying us and even killing us. Every week, I have honest conversations with people that inspire me. My hope is through their knowledge and unique perspectives they’ll inspire you too. Together, we’ll explore how you can make small tweaks in your life that amount to big changes for you, the people around you and the planet, so let’s do this. This is my show, the Darin Olien Show.

Darin: Hey, everybody. Welcome to the show. Thanks for tuning in. I again, am stoked that you’re taking the time to tune in, learn, expand, be inspired. And I just want to say listen, we just had the election. I don’t make political statements. I’m just not into it. I do believe in supporting what you believe is true for you. Here’s the only thing I’m probably going to say about this and that is, don’t give your power away to what you wanted to have happened and it didn’t. And also, don’t give your power away to what you think will happen if your candidate did win. The reason I say that is it’s great to be inspired and to be optimistic and or angry or upset over who won or who lost and grieve through that, and that’s fine, and that’s necessary, and that’s part of the journey. But I think the most important thing is by not giving your power in any direction, stay true to the center. The Native Americans call this the red road. You’re not way over here, and you’re not way over there. You’re taking the red road. It’s balanced, it’s within yourself, and within yourself and within your power, the coming together of people, the collaborations, the community, the human to human synergy and alchemy, and passion and faith and prayer and conviction. That is the most important thing. So don’t let your guard down. Don’t get overly hyped. Don’t get overly upset. Find your true north, find your center within yourself deeply. And from there, find other like-minded people, put your centeredness, your conviction, your passion into action now, today. That’s all I’m gonna say. So, this great guest Jeff Garner, he’s an American fashion designer. He’s a regular dude from Tennessee. He’s an artist. He’s best known for sustainable clothing, plant-based dyes on red carpets. He did this over 20 years ago. You know why? Because it was the right thing to do. He was one of 40 artists chosen for the Smithsonian Renwick Gallery 40 under 40 Exhibition in July 2012. In 2019, he won an Emmy for his documentary on toxins in clothing and sustainable fashion called Remastered. So I will put that in the show notes. You want to check that out, it’s incredible. You’re going to be blown away. Jeff is a fifth-generation Tennesseean and was raised on a gentleman’s horse farm outside of Nashville where nature inspired his creative soul. He graduated from Pepperdine University. That’s how we got exposed to the beauty of Malibu from Tennessee. And he worked in Stiletto Entertainment in Los Angeles, became creative directors for people like Barry Manilow, Fleetwood Mac, Donna Summer. And then he left and started driven clothing design band of merchandise and stage clothing back in Nashville. And people really became aware early on that he was a renegade and doing his own thing. He’s been in the London Fashion Week. He was inducted in the Smithsonian Museum in Tennessee. He was Vogues Top 10 Oscar dress that the Grammy winner Esperanza Spalding wore at the 84 Annual Academy Awards. He also works with Suzy and James Garner on the red carpet green dress contest for the Oscars each year. So you’re gonna find this incredibly fascinating and shocking, extremely shocking. We need to look at our clothes. We need to look at the dyes. We need to acknowledge that most clothes are not beneficial for you. So I started throwing away a lot of clothes, and being very careful what kind of clothes, where they’re from, and let’s just pop open this incredible world that you knew nothing about. And so you’re gonna learn something and you’re going to be aware of something and you will not be able to put that awareness back in the bottle. So, drumroll please. Super stoked for my good friend and this great conversation, Jeff Garner.

Darin: You have a such an interesting, eclectic background.

Jeff: Thanks.

Darin: And then I really want to talk about your point of view of literal fashion and how healthy it is but stylish and let’s pick into that. What’s your–

Jeff: Background story?

Darin: Yeah.

Jeff: Alright. I’ll do the shortened version. So I grew up in a farm, horse farm in Tennessee, just got really into with nature, everyday riding horses. It’s like what farm are we gonna play at. So both my grandmother’s had like organic gardens so I learn very quickly. They’re like the medicine women from Outlander. I mean, they were her. I mean, I just learned so much through them. And then naturally, I just grown up that way. My grandmother taught me to sew and taught me about fabrications and what things were made of and why it was important. And so my buddies were in bands back in Nashville, and they’re like, “Hey, be in our band. You got a good look. I’m like, “No, I don’t want to live that life, but I’ll dress you.”

Darin: How old were you?

Jeff: 14, 15, 16.

Darin: So it was just kind of there for you.

Jeff: Just kind of there, yeah. When I started diving in and started printing band t-shirts like graphic t shirts. I was like, wait a minute, this stuff’s gnarly. I see off-gassing off of the– So basically, they print it down on a screen and they run it through a heater and you can see it off-gassing. The guys wear a mask, like why are they wearing a mask? And just simply start asking questions. I realized it’s plastisol ink they’re using that gives you the stain power on the t-shirt and adhsives, the glues, formaldehyde, all this stuff. Wait a minute, this is all wrong, so highly toxic. Why are people breathing this in? And it obviously doesn’t dissipate, doesn’t wash out of your laundry like people think. It stays on this t-shirt for the life. So I went to this guy Wilflex, it’s a company in Atlanta, Georgia and said, “Hey, have you ever tried a new ink?” “No, but we’re willing to.” So this guy was kind of a science background. So we came up with organic pigment ink for screen printing.

Darin: And this was what year?

Jeff: I think I was 18 at the time. So it was great because then they could offer that to all their clients across the board. And then I knew the guys at American Apparel and Alternative Apparel because I buy banned t-shirts from them. It’s like, “Listen, why don’t we do this beautiful collection of organic cotton, influence it, like start doing this and see what happens.” And he tried to one season compared the cells to the regular stuff and obviously the regular stuff went out and said, “Yeah, I didn’t touch it.” Bigger margins, all that. And that’s the disconnect. It’s like, well, it’s gonna make commercial sense. So I went to the guy, Greg, from Atlanta, Georgia started Alternative Apparel. It’s a basic t-shirt brand as well. And they had these beautiful washes kind of vintage look. And I went to him. I said, “Hey, why don’t you try this, this and this.” And he was more open to it, he’s like, “Yeah, let’s do it.” And so they started like the first kind of eco-collection of t-shirts in a commercial way, and actually had enough margin, enough niche of a market that they kept it on and grow, grow, grow. So anyways, I said no to West Point, got my jeep, drove to California, ended up in Malibu, and it was like I felt these things aligning. When you let go of your own ego and say, “This is what I have to do.” I just gave it a chance and said, “You know, I know my vision is bigger than this.” And so I started going down this path and then I got hired by Solid Entertainment, who they do [00:09:47] Mac and Donna Summer at the time, their management. And I started doing the same thing I was doing for my band friends in Nashville with them. So I was a creative director so I design merch, stage clothing, stuff. That’s the shorter story although it’s a longer story but that’s how it began. And then I jumped ships 6 years later. I tried to travel the world then and said I want to do my own thing and that’s how Prophetic was born. And it was the reason I picked the name it’s because I wanted a deeper roots of just being another fashion brand selling fickle fashion. It was the idea of like, you can showcase sustainable fashion in a different way and get people to think and talk about it and like why it’s important.

Darin: Well, that’s kind of the economy that we’ve got. You can you can lay that across many industries but that’s the thing. We’re so into the modern world that we have now lost even the ability to question or we have the ability, we just haven’t asked the question like, what is on me?

Jeff: That’s it. And constant exposure causes acceptance. So I personally cannot, if I bought a pair of nylon boxers today and put them on, I would itch, scratch. I wouldn’t be able to wear them. I can touch my friends t-shirts, and it makes my hand itchy because I’ve separated from it for so long but now we accept the fact that we get hot in our workout gear because it’s not breathable because it’s made of wicker wear, or whatever it’s called. So it’s very interesting how that– Yeah, you’re right, we’re just disconnected from the natural product, just started going off the shelf gradually, slowly and then just dissipated. My grandmother, everything in her world was natural fabrics. She wouldn’t touch the other. But stuff like acrylic got introduced to the 1950s to that stay-at-home wife, so she wouldn’t have to wash these wool sweaters, special hand wash, because they naturally have to be. So they introduced acrylic, oh, you can put this in the washing machine. I loved it, but nobody questioned what acrylic does to immune system. They have no idea. And again, it’s a very bad culprit but what basically I’ve learned through all of this is that it is an addiction. So I could sit here and talk all day long about the chemicals in it, why it’s important and that would give awareness but you discover that people are addicted to cheap price points, as you were saying exactly, but people are still buying t-shirts for seven bucks. The same price in the 70s they were buying for us. So what’s happening? Well, we keep moving production manufacturing to different parts of the world that are still beating people down, beating factories down, workers down, they don’t have fair wages. And then we’re using synthetic cheap, cheap, cheap fabrications and we’re not changing that. So it’s like we’re still at the same price point but gas has gone up, living cost has gone up, rent’s gone up, but not clothing because it’s an addiction. We like that feel-good thing of I got a date next week, and I’m gonna buy a new dress at some best fashion company and then throw it away. The cycle is right now, it used to be about three months of a lifecycle. They did a study in 2000. It was like people would keep garments for about three months and then 1998, it was like eight months. Today, it’s like three days that they wear it and then toss it.

Darin: Come on. Literally, toss it?

Jeff: Yeah. I was teaching at Polimoda in Florence, Italy. Walking to it’s beautiful Villa right by the river in Florence. I’m walking to the villa from our first day of teaching masterclass of sustainability and then the crew is just a seasonal change. And it was one of those recycling bins, we have one at Malibu, it’s chevron but of recycling clothes. It was overflowing with winter jackets just hanging out. I mean, just overflowing. I walked in class, I go, “Raise your hand if you threw a winter coat at the recycling bin outside.” And it was like 10 hands go up. So it just shows you like we’re not making things that you’re going to wear your entire life cycle and or pass it down to generation. I’m still wearing stuff from my grandfather’s. It was passed down. He’s big horse riders [00:14:11] gear and it was beautifully hand tailored and made and still lasting.

Darin: It’s timeless.

Jeff: It’s timeless. Oh yeah. It’s amazing. And it has character. All these trendy designers are making stuff that looks like character, the washes, the holes and the denim, the whitewash and the sandblasting, all this gnarly stuff to give it character. Like you spin in your life for a long time, it has a lot of stories to tell, and it doesn’t. And that’s what we’re up against. It’s like, well, can we introduce this to consumers and have them care enough to be like, you know what, I heard what they’re saying on the podcast the other day and I want to make a shift and that’s can they break that addiction cycle, and they save for a month and buy a hemp pair of underwear versus nylon. My hemp underwear is twice as much as the Calvin Klein nylon. It’s like $40 price point. But if I give it to you, you’ll say oh, Jeff, organic waistband, natural rubber will last for like– I’ve had mine for like four years now and no issues with it. But hemp is a strongest fiber. Again, polyester mimicked hem. So it’s the longest plant, it just doesn’t break down. It is the like super fabric of our world. And we used to use it all in US. Andrew Jackson’s like everyone should grow hemp for fabrication purposes, not for other purposes. And then it just got taken out by other industries because it would put other industries out of business. It’s naturally porous in nature breeze, so it allows your body to just– it constricts during the winter, so it’s warmer. I mean, it just is a super fabric. And it holds dye 10 times better. Cotton, a lot of people say what about cotton? Well, it holds water, it holds moisture, it’s just the natural nature of cotton. So with hemp, I wear it for riding horses every day, it just doesn’t hold the moisture, so it doesn’t hold smells, antibacterial, antifungal. And so it’s great for boxers. They’re like the travel boxer, you can wear them, but promoting, I won’t say the name, but in a travel company, they’re promoting this boxer, but it’s made of polyester, sprayed with chemical, and they call it wicker wear. So, naturally with poly, when you drop water on it, it beads up and falls off, non permeable, non breathable. So obviously, anything underneath it won’t breathe or make you sweat more. They spray chemical on top of it, so that the bead of water spreads out and it dries faster, they call it wicker wear so they can own it, sell it, make money off of it. But it doesn’t do good for us as humans. So if you are an athlete and sponsored by some company, not gonna name names, and you’re going to your your, I don’t know, your motocross or your surf expo, and you have your jersey on and it’s made of this. And let’s say it fatigues your muscles 25% faster. Well, you as an athlete would want to own this, you’d want to wear the most performance level fabrication you could. But this these studies have been done, but nobody’s discussing or talking about it.

Darin: That’s really exciting to actually dig into because that’s an interesting angle. You’re containing this thing that can’t breathe. And now that thing that you’re containing, the body, the organs are heating up. So now the heat is acting almost like a tea. It’s bringing in almost osmotically and bringing in the chemical because of heat. So now you’re gonna absorb more of the chemical because you’re hotter. So there is this other side and the more I’m digging into this chemical exposure, the more these FDA, EPA, USDA are so under– they’re not even testing some of this stuff. So most of it, they’re not testing but then they throw out an article saying this is kind of dangerous, and yet it’s still in the atmosphere and in our environment. And so the proliferation, I don’t think we even know 1% of all of these exposures, all of the clothes we’re wearing all the time from everything all the time for our lifetime, and women and underneath our armpits and lymphatic and like, whoa.

Jeff: Oh, yeah, that’s why you discoloration when you run. So the aluminum in deodorant mixed in with the chemical dyes. I mean, it’s been in our face the whole time, but like you said, nobody’s gonna pay for these studies. And there have been, I do have like 16 published cases, but this is from scientists studying like, does our body, does our skin soak in the chemicals and the answer is yes. And then they found out what percentage.

Darin: You can share those with me and I can put it in the footnotes.

Jeff: Yeah, exactly. It’s not just some theory that we come up with but you find it’s spread out and it’s through the years. And actually, my buddy, Troy Amburg, the foundation, they’re going to help me fund the research project for 2020 just to get a new updated version of that like just simply, hey, give me your t-shirt and take it to the lab, independent lab and see what’s inside of it, and then figure that out because you just want to get back the power of choice. I think you say that too, just the consumer, if they believe this or if they don’t, they need to know like in your food you know this doesn’t have organic ingredients. Okay, cool. Your choice to buy it or not buy. But we have no idea what’s in our clothes and I could sit here and make you a new pair of denim. I don’t do denim, but I could do and I cut it out in my pattern, I take my pattern and cut it out. An excess fabric, I have to discard as toxic waste legally or I get fined.

Darin: Wait a minute, what? Hold on.

Darin: So for years, maybe most of my life, people have been asking me, “What kind of foods do you eat? What kind of exercises do you do? What kind of water should I drink?” All of these things and so much more we put into a 21-day program so that can take you through a theme every day of knowledge, action, and then eating these delicious meals, working out, getting support, anchoring in these new habits so you can do what? So that you can kick ass. So you have the energy, the vitality to live the kind of life that you really want. That’s what it’s all about. So all in this app, we have grocery lists, we have education about real hydration and what greater oxygenation and the balance of alkalinization. All of these things we are diving into as you’re heading down this hero’s journey of implementation into a new life to give you the kind of life that you actually want. So join my Tribe. All you have to do is go 121tribe.com. Sign up, and you get three free days. Join me on this hero’s journey. Join the Tribe.

Darin: I want to make sure everyone just heard that. If you work with denim and when you’ve completed your fabrication and product–

Jeff: Legally, I’m supposed to discard it in the toxic waste. I cannot just throw it in the trash because it has synthetic denim, I mean, synthetic indigo that is in the denim. They dip dye that so many times and that’s the formaldehyde, it’s heavy metals, so it doesn’t break down, but everyone thinks is cotton so it’s natural, but it’s the dye. And think about taking a beautiful wood wall and you paint toxic paint on top. It’s no longer a natural wood wall.

Darin: They manipulate you by saying hey, it’s organic cotton. They haven’t told the rest of the story, and the rest of the story is they’ve spent a lot of time toxifying and dipping that in incredibly immune-suppressing, hormone-manipulating, cancer-causing, kidney-disrupting chemicals. My mind just got blown ladies and gentlemen. The fact that you have to discard it as a toxic material tells the entire frickin story.

Jeff: Is that messed up, yeah.

Darin: That is the complete craziness.

Jeff: That I could sell it to you, give it to you, I put it on the shelf and a store but there’s no labeling that says, this may this may contain dah, dah, dah, you know, this could affect your health. There’s no warning label, no nothing, and that’s the scary part. So you have to leave it up to consumers to have their own education about it, which is why you have this platform, I have my platform to try to bring some sort of balance to the equation because it’s not out there. I mean, so many people live in denim, especially the yoga pants. So obviously guys, we both live in Malibu, and it’s a beautiful spot and nature driven and everyone’s super active. And so we have this place called Sunlife. And a lot of these young girls hang out there that that that are super healthy, and they go to yoga every day and they drink these beautiful smoothies in acai bowls, but then if you notice and you look close, they have little bumps on their back and on their neck. And you can ask them about it. And TDI is the name of the chemical, and it’s a hormone-disruptor. So what they’re doing, they’re living, they’re going to yoga and then off-gassing the heat buildup you just talked about. They’re living in it all day long. And so their system–

Darin: And this is well beyond. This is a lot of women live in their yoga pants.

Jeff: Yeah. And we have full sun most the time in Malibu. So the sun is a synergy affected. It creates the off-gassing as well. So you’re having it go straight ingest right into your skin, obviously. And these young girls are very sensitive to endocrine hormone disruptors. And that’s exactly what this is, especially those black ones that are heavily dyed. And it’s the spandex, which was created by DuPont in 1953, but anyways, I can tell you all the chemical names it’s made of it, but I don’t want to but that’s simply what it is. And so I go in yoga class upstairs, well, I used to before COVID, but I used to go upstairs to yoga class and I asked the teacher to open the windows because I could not breathe. I was that sensitive to it. It looks great. It makes you feel like you’re working out, you’re in shape. I get why people are emotionally attached to this tight legging stuff, but it’s not good for you. When I started yoga in the late 80s, like I’m wearing the show perk pants, baggy hemp pants. And it was kind of hippie, but it allows you to have flexibility without the stretch. And it’s a different day now. So now these girls are wondering what’s happening with them, why later in life they’re having issues having babies, etc, etc., and there is a synergy of connection. It’s called bio accummulation. You can’t sit there and say this causes this. So I want to be very clear here. So what you can say is that we all have bio accumulation levels depending on our body makeup, our health, our DNA structure, where we’re living, our environment, etc. but you don’t want to tip it over. So adding these clothes on an everyday level, it’s gonna eventually tip over your jar.

Darin: And this is a game what we were hinting at before. Okay, you’re in the yoga pants all day, but then you go into your car, and there’s this type of plastic and literally, the technical term is car fluff. It’s one of the gnarliest plastics.

Jeff: I haven’t heard that. I talk about the fabrication in the seats and it off-gases. There’s a reason why people get lung cancer without ever smoking because a car heats up and creates a cloud, you open the door and it goes straight into your lungs. It’s a formaldehyde in the seats because they spray it too because they want don’t want anything soaking in. It’s like oh, it’s anti, you can pet your dog in here.

Darin: It’s anti whatever. It’s anti-life, basically. So the plastics and all that stuff is a type of incredibly toxic. And then the car fluff is similar to that of a tire. It is so toxic. So the toxic exposure of car tires and car fluff, they can’t even recycle. They don’t have the technology to be able to even break that down because there’s so many chemicals involved that there’s no safe way. Anyway, so we’re going back to we’re in these environments, we’re in our homes, like this was made here and the couch we’re sitting on was specifically made in Malibu, like they didn’t have one that wasn’t clean without chemicals and organic. So I told them, well, I’m not buying a couch. And so some some guys in Malibu made it for me. So it’s like, we have to do that because we also have to put pressure on the big boys so that it can scale. And I think it’s happening. And we’re kind of just turning this into a big fatal convenience episode.

Jeff: Sorry.

Darin: No, it’s beautiful. And I want to get back to fashion because I don’t know enough about it. And I know without a doubt that the little bit that I have is just unregulated chemical. It’s on us all the time. It’s with us all the time. And again, the skin is the organ.

Jeff: Yeah. I mean, we’re naturally designed to be naked, to be nude. And so we’re clothing it with stuff that we’re obviously gonna be affected by it but it’s interesting. So everyone asked, well, what can we do, Jeff because they hear me talk. And I was like, well, you can just turn up your labels and look what’s in it. But here’s the other thing you’ll appreciate. If I made you a t-shirt right now, I can basically put any type of fabrication listed on it. Nobody’s going to regulate me. I could say your t-shirts, 100% hemp and it’s maybe a 50/50. There’s no regulation. It’s the weirdest thing I’ve ever– I can just make up something. So sometimes I’ll get friends sweaters like, oh no, this is cashmere. I’m like it’s a nyx. And they’re like, no, no, no, I bought it.

Darin: I paid 200 bucks.

Jeff: It’s not 100% cashmere, sorry. So there’s a need there, there’s an issue there. So you can’t flip over your tags and obviously you can choose. I’ve been looking just for fun, I never shop, I made my own stuff, but when I go in stores, I’m like, hey, what kind of socks do you have? And they show me and I’m like, do you have anything that’s natural without acrylic? And we go and look and look in and I saw a polyester acrylic mix. And it’s just intriguing for me to try to find natural product in the modern-day retail stores. I’m not gonna say the brand name but if you wash in this detergent that your mom washed with, let’s call it red, for example. Then naturally, you’re going to wash your clothes when you get out on your own and association. But these companies get away with listing what chemical ingredients are in it because it’s what makes their product unique so it’s protected under patent so they don’t have to disclose it. But it is the chemical makeup that creates anything that has a stain power with smell. Just note, it’s gonna be something gnarly, something you just don’t want on your skin. And so eventually, that addiction cycle continues, and that’s how they keep their target market and keep everyone but it’s the easiest thing one can change. So you can go to Whole Foods, Seven Generation is a great brand for a detergent that is clean and free, you know, these dyes and these smells.

Darin: Yeah, just think of that. So not only the clothes that we’re talking about is full of chemicals, now you’re bathing it in “washing” it in more chemicals.

Jeff: And that’s [00:30:51] etc. And then those little polymers break off the polyester, and our washing machines and/or our water systems here are not designed to capture those. So they’re talking about– you probably seen articles where the nano particles and the stuff they open up fish and it’s in there. Well, that’s how they get through, they get through all our filters because they’re not designed to catch things that small but that’s what’s happening. I mean, I live on the Beach County and I have a hippie neighbor, and he kind of got stuck with polyester because in the 70s that’s what they wore. And his laundry machine is now backed up, the pipes are backed up from all those little polymers that broke off. He can’t even use this laundry machine. It just shows you like it does accummulate and it doesn’t break down.

Darin: And that’s where the microcosm fits the macro too. It’s like, if we change these habits, number one, we’re not going to toxify our body anymore or start to minimize that. And at the same time, we’re having an immediate impact on the ecosystem.

Jeff: Oh, yeah. It goes hand in hand.

Darin: Yeah, we need to make those connections instead of waiting for this to just slap us in the face. Why do we have cancer? Why do I breast cancer? Why do I have colon? Why do I have prostate? Why do I have these weird bumps on my back? Why I have psoriasis? Why, why, why–

Jeff: Dermatitis.

Darin: Exactly. And it could be just this massive accumulation of toxins. And yet at the same time, we’re spending so much energy and money on the perfect supplement, the perfect way to eat. But if you don’t minimize the chemicalized lifestyle and what you’re ingesting and sucking in and breathing in your body, it’s like taking the said superfood is like showing up to a forest fire with a squirt gun. And we that’s why this is like a superfood. We need to take off the chemicals and put on these beautiful clothes. 

Jeff: Part of that plant-based lifestyle that you’re encouraging. And I always call it like you go to the gym and you’re like smoking in the gym and working out. Like when you wear these clothes is like it doesn’t make sense. So obviously, I talk about it, speak about it, encouraged people and try to bring that awareness. So what I’ve done is created a tour sustainable collection called Prophetic. And so I’ve been doing it about 18 years now. So I tour around. I work with US embassies a lot in other countries. I have one in Madeira. I use Madeira lace that used to be on these beautiful tablecloths and I turn it into gowns and kept showing them like, you can do things differently now because who’s having sit down dinners? Well, now we’re having more sit down dinners, but before, my grandmother had one of these beautiful table cloths, but we don’t collect those. And there’s a lot of hand detail. These women make it in villages and it’s beautiful. So I’ve been doing projects like that to bring in the idea of local craftsmanship. Again, it’s made of natural organic cotton and linen, and they’re embroidery. I mean, so try to do these projects around the world to bring and showcase, hey, we can do things differently. We just did Scotland where we had the linen there. These old linen factories are still making over there. They’re also making lace as well. So I did a show at Edinburgh Castle, has Mary Queen of Scots collection. So there are some theatrics to it but the idea is this high-end couture and people are attracted to that. So it’s kind of my platform and say, hey, this was dyed with Indigo or this was dyed with marigold flower and they’re like, really? And then I see it on– the best was when Giselle wore some gown. We went to the Rainforest Alliance Gala together in New York, and she wore this beautiful Indigo marigold-dyed gown made of hemp. And the whole headlines were like, Giselle wears hemp. It was great. If you saw it, you’d be like, no, this isn’t hemp, there’s no way. It was a hemp silk blend so it just hung well and had luminosity. And as you know plant-based dyes, they just read differently. They read differently in the light because they’re made of light, and all that stuff. So, unlike synthetics, they are just a flat color. So, other than the art form, it’s always been kind of a callus to present change, the idea of change. And so I just got back from London Fashion Week two weeks ago. Believe it or not, we did our catwalk which everyone wanted us to do. I think Burberry and a couple of others did a live catwalk. Everyone else was doing digital, but I felt it was a need to kind of say, hey, we needed move forward. We did everything properly, and everything was done, and in the right guidelines, but I did a Mad Hatter Collection. And then there was a company called Thomas [00:35:39] that makes these beautiful plates and that are all made of fine bone China. And again, do we collect those nowadays? We pass it down generation to generation. Well, these old tradition crafts are dying out. And so I did a design for them. And then we have the dinner table set and countdown in the middle of it was kind of cool with these beautiful Polynesian beautiful handmade fabrics. So it’s about this art infusion being abridge to say, hey, we can do things differently, we can keep these traditions alive, we can keep these crafts available locally. I mean, we use the yellow tones I dye with eucalyptus trees from our buddy. He has a place here in Malibu, we just pull these off his tree. So if you look around, there’s more that we can do that inspires and it’s that time to go back home to like create, I think.

Darin: And nature is the inspiration. I mean, it’s the inspiration of even all the way down to people wanting to synthesize and make drugs. Like in the colors, in the symphony. If I were a fashion guy, it would be exactly the same way that you went about it.

Darin: Many of you who follow me know I’ve spent most of my life searching for the healthiest foods on the planet. If you look hard enough, there are a few unknown extraordinary foods around the world that people still don’t know about. And a few years ago, I came across my favorite superfood discovery of all time, Barukas nuts. When I first tasted them, my eyes lit up. The taste alone just absolutely blew me away. But after sending them to the lab, which I do and getting all the tests, I realized they’re the health theists nuts on the planet. No other nut even compares. They have an unusually high amount of fiber and they’re off the charts in super high antioxidants and have few calories than any other nut. It’s jam-packed with micronutrients. But they’re not just good for you, they’re really good for the planet. Most other nuts require millions of gallons of irrigated water, but Baruka trees require no artificial irrigation. Barukas are truly good for you, good for the planet, and good for the world community. It’s a win all the way around. I really think you’ll love them, so I’m giving all of my listeners 15% off by going to barukas.com/darin. That’s B-A-R-U-K-A-S dot com backslash Darin, D-A-R-I-N. I know you will enjoy.

Darin: The thing I love about your story is you started this way. So the years and years and years, three decades plus.

Jeff: About 18 years, so yeah, two decades. I was kind of the weird guy.

Darin: But also you’ve always had this very high-end platform, I mean, aside from the rock and roll thing, is still actually a very high-end platform just a different way but then you took it. So I want to hear like what’s your vision for your company? And then I want to kind of break it down to a normal– After that, I want to break it down into a normal like, what people can do you think.

Jeff: Okay. So I say it every season every time I have to do a catwalk like, I think that was my last show. And I say that because 18 years of it beat your head against the door, but now people are finally listening and respecting it. Like our show in London, I’m not trying to self-promote, but we were on the front cover of The Times. That says something like sustainable fashion on the front cover of London Times. Well, okay, cool. That’s a great, you know, that’s–

Darin: Congratulations.

Jeff: So I feel like I’m kind of flying a flag for sustainable fashion at this point so I cannot put the banner down just yet until real shift and change happens. And there’s Greenpeace, Free America are really advocates about trying to go after some of the majors and get them to detox. They call it a detox campaign, and that’s good. But until that consumerism shift happens, I feel like I had to continue going and continue doing these kind of projects and showcasing. So that’s kind of like my crosshair, so to speak, which is fine, I can handle that. But I just kind of launched an intimate collection that is wearable so the tangibleness of it. I don’t think I was doing a good job with early on. I had like 70 stores. I had a store [00:41:02] here. And I was really doing more wearable pieces after the catwalk couture show but it was just to a point where it’s too much to handle and I was losing sight of the vision. So I narrowed it down. So now I’m just like, what’s the closest thing to our body as well intimates. And I lost my mom last November to breast cancer and that was a catalyst. Okay, now it’s time, Jeff. You’ve been doing these other bigger things, great, but let’s get this on people so we don’t want another mom, another dad, another guy to get prostate cancer. So it’s like at least bringing the alternative to mainstream. And so that’s what I’m doing and hopefully encouraging. I hope everyone copies and tries to do it too because then we shifted it. And until then, I’m just doing a hemp boxer. That’s kind of a higher price point. And people are like, oh, that’s cool.

Darin: You’re doing now?

Jeff: Doing now, yeah. It’s funny. When I talk about it, you know, I talk about this subject matter a lot and this is a whole nother segment, but I always call it the brolic test. And this really connects with people as well. I say it now because I start off saying, hey, I’m Southern gentlemen, forgive me, but gentlemen and/or ladies, if you take off the bra of your girlfriend and you start kissing her breast and it tastes like an envelope, you just licked at the post office, that’s the formaldehyde. That’s the glue, that’s the same power that’s in the dyes, and then the bra. And every single person recognizes that. They’re like, wow. And then the girls are like, really? And the guys are like, I know exactly what you’re talking about. And you could say, oh, it’s sweaty. No, it’s not sweat. It’s because of the off-gassing.

Darin: So it’s on your mammary glands, it’s on your lymphatic all the time.

Jeff: Because as you know, the breast, they have a lot of fat tissue and that holds the toxins in. So if it’s not allowed to escape to leave, if your lymphatic system, I mean, you sweat off like about a pound a day or something of toxins. Well, if it’s not allowed to leave and not to mention bras are very tight fitting. So your lymphatic system works like a clock. You don’t have to wind it up, it works on movement. So it’s not moving things out like it should because it’s constricted. But there’s again, tons of studies. I can give you all this details, but it’s something for women to think about. There is a correlation here and we need to look at that and say, okay, wow. And the same with the men and the prostate. It’s the same deal. So anyways, long story short, that’s why I dove into this. The idea is like, wow, I know too much. I got to do this. Anyways, that’s the vision right now.

Darin: Yeah. I’m similar.

Jeff: You can’t stop, right?

Darin: You can’t stop. You want to deliver it. I want to give this to people. I mean, at the end of the day, if we didn’t have to be sustainable, I just give all this stuff away. I’d give formulas away. I’d give superfoods away, but of course, there’s a sustainable side to that, we have to make money on that stuff, but the passion and the heart-led mission is there. How do you suggest people move forward? I mean, I know you can’t necessarily or maybe you can, I don’t know, rifle off the companies to look at or support or whatever, but how does one now look at their– Okay, they just heard this episode and they’re like, everything in my closet potentially is a toxic tea that I’m now bathing in.

Jeff: I get different reactions. Some of my friends go home and literally clean out their wardrobe and start afresh but they may have the means to do so. And they’re not so constrictive. But it’s funny, I always joke like, you know what dad makes your teenage daughter, her first training bra, like I made her a hemp training bra. And Bella was like, dad–

Darin: Oh, your daughter?

Jeff: Yeah, my daughter. But even then she was like, it wasn’t cool with her friend sets so she can shift and change. So obviously, I’m talking to an older audience to say, yeah, when you go home, you can check what’s natural, what’s not natural, probably it’s 10% maybe natural in a closet, probably, maybe, we hope. But then just making educated strategy purchases, like if winter’s coming on, you want that nice wool coat. But the problem is wool coat so they’re lined with acetate, which is a non breathable, non permeable, so you want something lined with silk but this is stuff you wouldn’t actually know. So the easiest thing I always say is intimates and sheets six to eight hours a night. That’s when you’re supposed off-gas these chemicals [00:45:51] polyester sheets and it’s not happening. So I make my own hemp sheets. Eventually, hopefully, I can add that to the list that we’re gonna manufacture. But there are companies out of Europe, you can get online that do organic cotton. Bamboos are okay, it’s not the best solution.

Darin: It can be chemicalized.

Jeff: Yeah, exactly. And so I’m always an advocate for either organic cotton or hemp. Hemp is going to be better because organic cotton again will hold in the moisture. So you can find hemp sheets online. You can find natural cotton right now online. I’m doing the hemp boxers for men, but there are solutions out there but you have to be more thorough in your research.

Darin: Those are two good things to start with. For sure, you’re laying in your bed for a minimum of eight hours. And so change your sheets everyone. People don’t change them enough anyway so change your sheets.

Jeff: With hemp, you wouldn’t have to wash them as much either.

Darin: There you go. And those of you, also mattresses. The off-gassing of mattresses is a big deal.

Jeff: It’s a big deal. We got a couple of companies in California that make natural rubber mattresses.

Darin: And then your underwear. Anything else in terms of next?

Jeff: Yeah, I mean, we said earlier the detergents are key, but little things like crack your windows of your car because you want that off-gassing to leave your car that’s taken in your lungs because we all have the plastic and formaldehyde in seats. These little life changes you can make.

Darin: And take your clothes off as much as you can.

Jeff: That’s it. You can sleep nude ideally, and your new sheets and that’s great. And definitely ladies don’t wear your bras at home because you don’t want that constriction. I go to the point I make myself bamboo shorts out of silk.

Darin: Come on.

Jeff: No, I’m serious. Because think about it, you’re out in the beach, UV rays hit, I’m not wearing that nylon. No way. I’m not gonna fry my kids. So I take it to the purest level. But that’s the idea is that I introduced to Surfrider Foundation. Look guys, we can do these and get the word out.

Darin: How do we scale that man?

 

Jeff: That’s it. And the beauty is I surf– when I’m in Malibu, I surf two or three times a day because I live on the water. So I’m in and off, in and out these portraits. They last roughly about a year. And then the silk naturally starts biodegrading which is what you want. Cut off the snaps on them, and I make a new pair. And that’s how I wish it could be done is that I only have one pair and I were through them. And then I replaced them with the new. That old kind of thinking would be a nice way to move forward I think is just have what you need. And amongst this crisis, I think people are more open to that. And that’s a great way of moving forward. It’s not overwhelming. It’s like think through everything that you wear, so your yoga pants. Okay. There are some alternative options already on the market.

Darin: I’ve talked to a company called, have you heard of [00:49:06] So they are an organic, mostly cotton but literally, you can get these shirts. And you when you’re done, send them back and they will absolutely recycle those shirts and kick out other shirts. So on a big level, I’m talking to him on several levels to help support because they work with the World Wildlife Federation and a bunch of these other–

Jeff: That’s a great program. There’s a big thing, I’m talking on this really quickly. There’s what they call in the fashion world like this circular economy. And just let me speak on it really quickly, but that was created so these bigger companies keep doing what they’re doing and keep using polyester, which is basically plastic as we know, so they can keep it and it still feels good because we’re gonna recycle it, we’re gonna keep it. And the reality is you cannot break down, so if I took your t-shirt, and it was a polyester, I had to know exactly the percentage of polyester and what the other fabrics were in order to separate it and actually break it down to where it needed to be to respin it, and to have polyester yarn to reuse it. Nobody’s taking the time to do that. Think about it. They’re just landfilling with this recycled neon polyester. They’re not taking into the recycling programs, like you said earlier, 10 percents actually being recycled. It’s the same–

Darin: It’s probably a big stretch.

Jeff: It’s the same gimmick going on in that circular economy idea. But it’s like a hybrid instead of doing the Tesla electric car. It’s like a patch to say we are thinking about screenwashing. We need to get rid of polyester all together and nylon. We need to get rid of that.

Darin: It’s a new platform I’m going to talk on to.

Jeff: It’s something I was hesitant about mentioning but actually you can find it, you can Google it and find it. But basically, Victoria Secrets was sued by 600 women, saying that their bras caused them to break out and rash and there was a linkage with breast cancer. So you can view it, obviously, it was a public case.

Darin: Public information. And that’s only 600 women who had the courage to do it.

Jeff: Yeah. And it got settled out in court obviously. When you go up against a company of that nature, obviously, they have the money and the PR to handle it. But what they ended up saying in the press was that it was the wire and the brawls that caused the reaction. So there’s some truth to a wire is a conduit of radiations.

Darin: Electromagnetic change. 

Jeff: So there could be that but it was done in such a way that they can easily replace it with plastic, still have the constructed bra, and that support system, not basically have to change the way in which they manufacture but they don’t talk about the fabrications, the dyes, the toxins in that. And again, address that issue because they would have to change their entire manufacturing process, source new fabrications, figure out how to do these dyes that are not as intensive as what they’re using, which they are on the marketplace, by the way. And so therefore, they just did it basically what I consider a cover up, so they wouldn’t have to amass the real reason so they wouldn’t have to change because it would potentially put them out of business or at least hurt their business. And their bralets would not be $15 anymore, and they would be more. You can read it also lately Delta Airlines, two women came out and they were stewardess and said that they were breaking on a rash with their new uniforms that were designed by a fashion designer called Zac Posen. Well, he in turn sued his manufacturers saying it was their fault because they put the chemicals in the uniforms or whatever. But essentially, these uniforms are made of polyester because you don’t have to iron them and they look good. But again, no breathability and they’re purple color. Well, that dye’s very intensive and the formaldehyde and heavy metals as well. So you could see the correlation there, but then any designer knows what’s in his fabrics. We know, we know what our stuff’s made of. So there’s a higher ethical issue here of like, okay, well, it’s probably good for business, but what are you doing to the people wearing it? And these people are in high altitudes on a plane working.

Darin: Already under stress.

Jeff: Under stress. And I don’t know how that case settled out or what happened to it, but I imagine I haven’t heard about it much anymore, but it’s not the first time. There’s more and more cases of this, but they get buried under. As a designer, there’s no way I can make something that I knew could potentially hurt a human body and or environment. It just would not be okay in my mindset. So there’s that commercial driven ethical dilemma where they look the other way and or ignore it because it’s for profit, and unfortunately, we’re in that society today and we need to shift it.

Darin: Dude, this was amazing. And I think it’s a start of I want to help. I want to help in any way I can. It’s in my blood. And I don’t want any more toxins in my blood.

Jeff: I can see that.

Darin: I have passion in my blood. I really am stoked for what you’re doing.

Jeff: Thank you.

Darin: And yeah, let’s keep pushing this thing. I want to help scale this whatever that looks like.

Jeff: Yeah, well let’s get you some support shorts.

Darin: Perfect, man. Thank you, brother.

Jeff: Awesome, thanks.

[00:39:01] Third Part of the Interview

Darin: The thing I love about your story is you started this way. So the years and years and years, three decades plus.

Jeff: About 18 years, so yeah, two decades. I was kind of the weird guy.

Darin: But also you’ve always had this very high-end platform, I mean, aside from the rock and roll thing, is still actually a very high-end platform just a different way but then you took it. So I want to hear like what’s your vision for your company? And then I want to kind of break it down to a normal– After that, I want to break it down into a normal like, what people can do you think.

Jeff: Okay. So I say it every season every time I have to do a catwalk like, I think that was my last show. And I say that because 18 years of it beat your head against the door, but now people are finally listening and respecting it. Like our show in London, I’m not trying to self-promote, but we were on the front cover of The Times. That says something like sustainable fashion on the front cover of London Times. Well, okay, cool. That’s a great, you know, that’s–

Darin: Congratulations.

Jeff: So I feel like I’m kind of flying a flag for sustainable fashion at this point so I cannot put the banner down just yet until real shift and change happens. And there’s Greenpeace, Free America are really advocates about trying to go after some of the majors and get them to detox. They call it a detox campaign, and that’s good. But until that consumerism shift happens, I feel like I had to continue going and continue doing these kind of projects and showcasing. So that’s kind of like my crosshair, so to speak, which is fine, I can handle that. But I just kind of launched an intimate collection that is wearable so the tangibleness of it. I don’t think I was doing a good job with early on. I had like 70 stores. I had a store [00:41:02] here. And I was really doing more wearable pieces after the catwalk couture show but it was just to a point where it’s too much to handle and I was losing sight of the vision. So I narrowed it down. So now I’m just like, what’s the closest thing to our body as well intimates. And I lost my mom last November to breast cancer and that was a catalyst. Okay, now it’s time, Jeff. You’ve been doing these other bigger things, great, but let’s get this on people so we don’t want another mom, another dad, another guy to get prostate cancer. So it’s like at least bringing the alternative to mainstream. And so that’s what I’m doing and hopefully encouraging. I hope everyone copies and tries to do it too because then we shifted it. And until then, I’m just doing a hemp boxer. That’s kind of a higher price point. And people are like, oh, that’s cool.

Darin: You’re doing now?

Jeff: Doing now, yeah. It’s funny. When I talk about it, you know, I talk about this subject matter a lot and this is a whole nother segment, but I always call it the brolic test. And this really connects with people as well. I say it now because I start off saying, hey, I’m Southern gentlemen, forgive me, but gentlemen and/or ladies, if you take off the bra of your girlfriend and you start kissing her breast and it tastes like an envelope, you just licked at the post office, that’s the formaldehyde. That’s the glue, that’s the same power that’s in the dyes, and then the bra. And every single person recognizes that. They’re like, wow. And then the girls are like, really? And the guys are like, I know exactly what you’re talking about. And you could say, oh, it’s sweaty. No, it’s not sweat. It’s because of the off-gassing.

Darin: So it’s on your mammary glands, it’s on your lymphatic all the time.

Jeff: Because as you know, the breast, they have a lot of fat tissue and that holds the toxins in. So if it’s not allowed to escape to leave, if your lymphatic system, I mean, you sweat off like about a pound a day or something of toxins. Well, if it’s not allowed to leave and not to mention bras are very tight fitting. So your lymphatic system works like a clock. You don’t have to wind it up, it works on movement. So it’s not moving things out like it should because it’s constricted. But there’s again, tons of studies. I can give you all this details, but it’s something for women to think about. There is a correlation here and we need to look at that and say, okay, wow. And the same with the men and the prostate. It’s the same deal. So anyways, long story short, that’s why I dove into this. The idea is like, wow, I know too much. I got to do this. Anyways, that’s the vision right now.

Darin: Yeah. I’m similar.

Jeff: You can’t stop, right?

Darin: You can’t stop. You want to deliver it. I want to give this to people. I mean, at the end of the day, if we didn’t have to be sustainable, I just give all this stuff away. I’d give formulas away. I’d give superfoods away, but of course, there’s a sustainable side to that, we have to make money on that stuff, but the passion and the heart-led mission is there. How do you suggest people move forward? I mean, I know you can’t necessarily or maybe you can, I don’t know, rifle off the companies to look at or support or whatever, but how does one now look at their– Okay, they just heard this episode and they’re like, everything in my closet potentially is a toxic tea that I’m now bathing in.

Jeff: I get different reactions. Some of my friends go home and literally clean out their wardrobe and start afresh but they may have the means to do so. And they’re not so constrictive. But it’s funny, I always joke like, you know what dad makes your teenage daughter, her first training bra, like I made her a hemp training bra. And Bella was like, dad–

Darin: Oh, your daughter?

Jeff: Yeah, my daughter. But even then she was like, it wasn’t cool with her friend sets so she can shift and change. So obviously, I’m talking to an older audience to say, yeah, when you go home, you can check what’s natural, what’s not natural, probably it’s 10% maybe natural in a closet, probably, maybe, we hope. But then just making educated strategy purchases, like if winter’s coming on, you want that nice wool coat. But the problem is wool coat so they’re lined with acetate, which is a non breathable, non permeable, so you want something lined with silk but this is stuff you wouldn’t actually know. So the easiest thing I always say is intimates and sheets six to eight hours a night. That’s when you’re supposed off-gas these chemicals [00:45:51] polyester sheets and it’s not happening. So I make my own hemp sheets. Eventually, hopefully, I can add that to the list that we’re gonna manufacture. But there are companies out of Europe, you can get online that do organic cotton. Bamboos are okay, it’s not the best solution.

Darin: It can be chemicalized.

Jeff: Yeah, exactly. And so I’m always an advocate for either organic cotton or hemp. Hemp is going to be better because organic cotton again will hold in the moisture. So you can find hemp sheets online. You can find natural cotton right now online. I’m doing the hemp boxers for men, but there are solutions out there but you have to be more thorough in your research.

Darin: Those are two good things to start with. For sure, you’re laying in your bed for a minimum of eight hours. And so change your sheets everyone. People don’t change them enough anyway so change your sheets.

Jeff: With hemp, you wouldn’t have to wash them as much either.

Darin: There you go. And those of you, also mattresses. The off-gassing of mattresses is a big deal.

Jeff: It’s a big deal. We got a couple of companies in California that make natural rubber mattresses.

Darin: And then your underwear. Anything else in terms of next?

Jeff: Yeah, I mean, we said earlier the detergents are key, but little things like crack your windows of your car because you want that off-gassing to leave your car that’s taken in your lungs because we all have the plastic and formaldehyde in seats. These little life changes you can make.

Darin: And take your clothes off as much as you can.

Jeff: That’s it. You can sleep nude ideally, and your new sheets and that’s great. And definitely ladies don’t wear your bras at home because you don’t want that constriction. I go to the point I make myself bamboo shorts out of silk.

Darin: Come on.

Jeff: No, I’m serious. Because think about it, you’re out in the beach, UV rays hit, I’m not wearing that nylon. No way. I’m not gonna fry my kids. So I take it to the purest level. But that’s the idea is that I introduced to Surfrider Foundation. Look guys, we can do these and get the word out.

Darin: How do we scale that man?

 

Jeff: That’s it. And the beauty is I surf– when I’m in Malibu, I surf two or three times a day because I live on the water. So I’m in and off, in and out these portraits. They last roughly about a year. And then the silk naturally starts biodegrading which is what you want. Cut off the snaps on them, and I make a new pair. And that’s how I wish it could be done is that I only have one pair and I were through them. And then I replaced them with the new. That old kind of thinking would be a nice way to move forward I think is just have what you need. And amongst this crisis, I think people are more open to that. And that’s a great way of moving forward. It’s not overwhelming. It’s like think through everything that you wear, so your yoga pants. Okay. There are some alternative options already on the market.

Darin: I’ve talked to a company called, have you heard of [00:49:06] So they are an organic, mostly cotton but literally, you can get these shirts. And you when you’re done, send them back and they will absolutely recycle those shirts and kick out other shirts. So on a big level, I’m talking to him on several levels to help support because they work with the World Wildlife Federation and a bunch of these other–

Jeff: That’s a great program. There’s a big thing, I’m talking on this really quickly. There’s what they call in the fashion world like this circular economy. And just let me speak on it really quickly, but that was created so these bigger companies keep doing what they’re doing and keep using polyester, which is basically plastic as we know, so they can keep it and it still feels good because we’re gonna recycle it, we’re gonna keep it. And the reality is you cannot break down, so if I took your t-shirt, and it was a polyester, I had to know exactly the percentage of polyester and what the other fabrics were in order to separate it and actually break it down to where it needed to be to respin it, and to have polyester yarn to reuse it. Nobody’s taking the time to do that. Think about it. They’re just landfilling with this recycled neon polyester. They’re not taking into the recycling programs, like you said earlier, 10 percents actually being recycled. It’s the same–

Darin: It’s probably a big stretch.

Jeff: It’s the same gimmick going on in that circular economy idea. But it’s like a hybrid instead of doing the Tesla electric car. It’s like a patch to say we are thinking about screenwashing. We need to get rid of polyester all together and nylon. We need to get rid of that.

Darin: It’s a new platform I’m going to talk on to.

Jeff: It’s something I was hesitant about mentioning but actually you can find it, you can Google it and find it. But basically, Victoria Secrets was sued by 600 women, saying that their bras caused them to break out and rash and there was a linkage with breast cancer. So you can view it, obviously, it was a public case.

Darin: Public information. And that’s only 600 women who had the courage to do it.

Jeff: Yeah. And it got settled out in court obviously. When you go up against a company of that nature, obviously, they have the money and the PR to handle it. But what they ended up saying in the press was that it was the wire and the brawls that caused the reaction. So there’s some truth to a wire is a conduit of radiations.

Darin: Electromagnetic change. 

Jeff: So there could be that but it was done in such a way that they can easily replace it with plastic, still have the constructed bra, and that support system, not basically have to change the way in which they manufacture but they don’t talk about the fabrications, the dyes, the toxins in that. And again, address that issue because they would have to change their entire manufacturing process, source new fabrications, figure out how to do these dyes that are not as intensive as what they’re using, which they are on the marketplace, by the way. And so therefore, they just did it basically what I consider a cover up, so they wouldn’t have to amass the real reason so they wouldn’t have to change because it would potentially put them out of business or at least hurt their business. And their bralets would not be $15 anymore, and they would be more. You can read it also lately Delta Airlines, two women came out and they were stewardess and said that they were breaking on a rash with their new uniforms that were designed by a fashion designer called Zac Posen. Well, he in turn sued his manufacturers saying it was their fault because they put the chemicals in the uniforms or whatever. But essentially, these uniforms are made of polyester because you don’t have to iron them and they look good. But again, no breathability and they’re purple color. Well, that dye’s very intensive and the formaldehyde and heavy metals as well. So you could see the correlation there, but then any designer knows what’s in his fabrics. We know, we know what our stuff’s made of. So there’s a higher ethical issue here of like, okay, well, it’s probably good for business, but what are you doing to the people wearing it? And these people are in high altitudes on a plane working.

Darin: Already under stress.

Jeff: Under stress. And I don’t know how that case settled out or what happened to it, but I imagine I haven’t heard about it much anymore, but it’s not the first time. There’s more and more cases of this, but they get buried under. As a designer, there’s no way I can make something that I knew could potentially hurt a human body and or environment. It just would not be okay in my mindset. So there’s that commercial driven ethical dilemma where they look the other way and or ignore it because it’s for profit, and unfortunately, we’re in that society today and we need to shift it.

Darin: Dude, this was amazing. And I think it’s a start of I want to help. I want to help in any way I can. It’s in my blood. And I don’t want any more toxins in my blood.

Jeff: I can see that.

Darin: I have passion in my blood. I really am stoked for what you’re doing.

Jeff: Thank you.

Darin: And yeah, let’s keep pushing this thing. I want to help scale this whatever that looks like.

Jeff: Yeah, well let’s get you some support shorts.

Darin: Perfect, man. Thank you, brother.

Jeff: Awesome, thanks.

Darin: That was a fantastic episode. What was the one thing that you got out of today’s conversation? If today’s episode struck a chord with you, and you want to dive a little deeper on a variety of topics, check out my live deep dives on darinolien.com/deepdive. More episodes are available on darinolien.com as well. Keep diving my friends, keep diving.

Darin: This episode is produced by my team at Must Amplify, an audio marketing company that specializes in giving a voice to a brand and making sure the right people hear it. If you would like or are thinking about doing a podcast or even would like a strategy session to add your voice to your brand in a powerful way, go to www.mustamplify.com/darin. That’s www.mustamplify.com/darin.

1 Comment
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